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Western Civilisation

Join Gab (@StFerdinandIII) Western Civilisation was and is superior to anything Islam has developed.  Islam has not aided in the development of the modern world; in fact civilisation has only been created in spite of Islam.  Raising the alarm about the fascism called Submission since 2000.  

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Medieval/Early Modern Christianity - Recent Articles

Henri Pirenne: Mohammed and Charlemagne. Rome never 'Fell'. It was replaced.

No 'Dark Ages' until the Musulman invasions.

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First part here.

 

The ‘Enlightenment’ darkened history.  One aspect of the violence done to Europe’s past, its culture and heritage, is the lie, repeated everywhere, ad-nauseum, based on men wearing wigs who did no primary research and who viewed themselves as the insufferably highest of ‘evolved’ beings; is that ‘Rome fell’.  It crashed on a dark day in 476 A.D.  A resounding clap and storm of thunder and disagreement from the civilisation Gods redounded across Western Europe as rain and hail fell.  Immediately a dark veil of superstition, ignorance and palaeolithic beliefs was pulled across Europe, expressed by the Catholic Church, a target of hate and opprobrium for the Enlighteners, who in their ignorance and bigotry failed to recognise that their own rather easy lives were built on the civilisation created by the Church and Christianity.  In this historical revisionism, Rome collapsed in 476, and the Continent pulled by the dead weight of the anti-rational Church, fell into an abyss.  Nothing remotely like this occurred. But truth was never the objective of the endarkening religion of ‘rationalism’, itself irrationally proposing extreme opposites from reality. 

 

The Roman empire carried on after 476, and very little was altered, until the time of the Muhammadan invasions and destruction of the Mediterranean Christian civilisation starting in 637 AD.  The unified Christian cultural achievement centred around the Mare Nostrum was not shattered by the German takeover of the Western part of the Roman empire.  It was sundered by the Muslim Jihad which separated Syria, North Africa, Spain, southern France (until the mid-9th century) and parts of Italy and the Western Mediterranean isles, from Christian Byzantium and the world’s largest city, manufacturing entrepot and port, Constantinople.  Trade, culture, money, paper and consumer goods were deranged, the ports shrank, the merchant fleets were abandoned, the massive increase in White slavery (with links to the Vikings), Jihad, piracy, raids, and slaughter of Christians along European coasts, reduced the once urbanised areas of Western Europe to penury and ruin.  Europe turned from the Mediterranean to the north, and went from a trading empire, to a land-based empire, assaulted on three fronts by the Musulmans, the Vikings and the Avars/Huns from the early 8th century to the 10th centuries. 

 

Before the Muslim Jihad the Western European economy was still Mediterranean-centric, prosperous and along the coasts and trade routes, urbanised.  No collapse can be discerned and the evidence in Visigothic Spain and elsewhere, points to a profoundly rich civilisation.  Sutton Hoo in England, at the fringes of the former Roman state, has revealed an enormously rich 6th century Saxon burial chamber indicating a society with extreme surplus of income and wealth, and trade routes stretching into Asia.  This site is 100 years after the ‘fall of Rome’ and puts a lie to the myth of an age of darkness and ignorance.

 

Pirenne relates how the absolutism of the Roman Empire and its wealth, once transmogrified into German-dominated states, found expression in the new merger of Church and State, in which secular powers used the Church, its organisation, literacy, influence and prestige, to administer, admonish and acquire societal order and control.

 

“Nothing could be less Germanic than the royalty of these military leaders.  It was simply personal power; exactly what we find in the Empire.

 

In all these Kingdoms the absolutism of the king is explained by his financial power.  Everywhere, as the successor of the Emperor, he disposed of the fisc and the taxes.  Now the wealth of the fisc was enormous.  It included the Imperial domain, the forests, the waste lands, the mines, the ports, and the highways, and there were also the taxes and the mint.  Thus the king was a landed proprietor of enormous wealth, and he also possessed a formidable treasury of minted gold.  No prince in the West, before the 13th century, can have been so rich in money as these kings.  The description of their treasuries calls up the image of a river of gold.  Above all, this wealth enabled the king to pay his functionaries…..the retention of the Roman impost and the market-toll were the essential sources of their power….”

 

The above describes a wealthy, energetic, urban, trading society.  Schools, literacy, poets, writers and artists were legion.  Pagan classics were still copied and learnt.  Iconography and religious art were created and appreciated.  Windmills, watermills, pumps, textiles, medicines and monasteries were built, manufactured, founded and expanded.  The lengthening lines of commerce illustrate a large sub-stratum of literate professionals, engaged in contracts, pricing, transactions, credit, interest bearing loans and detailed record keeping.  This was no backwater, isolated, enclosed and autarchic civilisation. 

 

Cities existed and expanded.  Bathing never disappeared given that the aqueducts, infrastructure, plumbing and movement of water was not destroyed in the urban areas.  Trade in spices, oil (for lamps, replaced by wax candles post the Musulman invasions), paper, jewels, manufactured consumer goods from the East, food, wine and other products not available locally accelerated until the Musulman closing of sea traffic which started with the conquest of Spain in 720 A.D.  The Western Mediterranean was severed from Byzantium and the reduction in trade and interchange was profound and obvious by the time of Charlemagne’s rule circa 770 A.D.

 

Like so much ‘common knowledge’ in the ‘age of science’ the idea that Rome ‘fell’ is a myth which serves a purpose.  It was proposed by those who hated the Church and Christianity.  It is promoted today by the same like-minded bigots who wish to devalue their own culture and heritage and who wish the destruction of the Church. 

 

Henry More and Richard the Lionheart. Two opposite ends of the Christian spectrum.

Creating the modern world.

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Two notable events in Western Christian history this week. 

 

Henry More

Henry More (1614–1687), an English philosopher, scientist, and theologian.

September 1 marks the anniversary of when Henry More, a notable 17th century Christian philosopher, theologian, scientist and poet, died at the age of 72.

More was known for being a prominent member of the Cambridge Platonist movement, which sought to reconcile Ancient Greek philosopher Plato’s ideas with Christianity.

 In 1671, More had his magnum opus Enchiridion metaphysicum published, which argued for what he called a “Spirit of Nature” as a driving force of how the world functioned.

 

Richard the Lionheart

September 2 1192, Richard the Lionheart signs the Treaty of Jaffa (3rd Crusade ends)

 

English King Richard I (1157-1199), known as the Lionheart for his military prowess and physical strength, led the Third Crusade to victories at Acre and the coast of Israel, before signing a treaty with Saladin. 

Jaffa was a city 40 miles from Jerusalem, the end target objective of the Third Crusade.  The Crusaders were surrounded but successfully fought off the Muslim armies at Jaffa, who suffered deep losses.  The Lionheart led a Christian relief force which swept away the Muslims besieging the city and the Crusaders defending it.  Even with this victory, it was clear that the Christians did not have enough men to take Jerusalem, and the Muslims did not have the requisite force or ambition to dislodge the Christians from their strongholds along the coast.  

The Catholic Enlightenment, Ulrich L. Lehner. Nicholas Bergier, defender of the Church.

Bergier would be anathema to Pope Francis and the current Globalist-Humanist Church.

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There is an important section in this book, which outlines the little known story of Nicholas Bergier who was an 18th century French priest and critic of ‘The Enlightenment’.  His importance is that he lays out the rational case for Catholicism, its morality, practicality, inventiveness and rationality.  He carries on the work of St. Thomas Acquinas who also answered critics of the Church and its mysteries of faith, with evidence of reasonable rationality and natural applicability of Church doctrines, rituals and beliefs.

 

As a parish priest he wrote a best-selling book, ‘Deism Refuted’ in 1765 which destroyed the main themes of ‘Enlightened’ Deism.  Freed from pastoral duties after this success he wrote full time and produced a long array of volumes defending the Church against its ‘Rationalist’ enemies including the insufferably inane Jean Jacques Rousseau. 

 

Rousseau and the ‘Romantic Rationalists’ offered that if God existed, he can best be experienced within the purity of nature.  Man must return to nature to recover God.  Societal institutions which stand between man and God must therefore be dismantled including the entire hierarchy of the Church.  Bergier recognised that this argument was more powerful, if however deluded, than the ‘rationalisations’ offered by Deists, or Atheists who denied the existence of created order and a creating intelligence and spirit.  Bergier argued that Christianity was never a private revelation but instead a revelation of humankind through witnesses, saints and prophets.  One cannot be a Christian without accepting their testimony and doctrines.  This demanded an institution to codify the arguments, revelations, dogma, rites and rituals in order to understand the true nature of Christianity and God.  Rituals such as baptism, the sacraments and communal masses were fundamental to exploring and comprehending God and his covenant.  Without such rituals no religion long survives.

 

Bergier also attacked d’Holbach the foremost Atheist of the era, who attempted to show that Christianity led to barbarism, because it perverted man’s nature.  Bergier destroyed this fallacy through an enormous display of facts and erudition, contending that Christianity and especially its morality, led to creativity, energy, invention and happiness.  Importantly Bergier rejected the ‘planned grace’ of God, as maintained by St. Augustine and picked up by Protestants who believe in pre-destination as incorrect.  Grace, said Bergier, was open to all who accepted Christ and God, and who showed through good works their faith and belief.  This could include even the salvation of those who unknowingly (such as in the Americas or Orient), were outside the formal Church. 

 

In today’s Catholic Church, a voice such as Bergier’s would be censored and shut down.  He would be decried by the Vatican Curia and Pope as a ‘traditionalist’, someone who was not ‘progressive’ and who stubbornly refused ‘new facts’ and ‘science’ that the Church must adapt to.  He would be thought too doctrinaire and ‘divisive’.  But this is how religions end.  When the beliefs, the mysteries, the saints, the immaterial, the deeply contemplative and philosophical is abandoned, so too is reason and practicality, along with purpose and truth.  When a Church simply becomes another outlet for mainstream views, propaganda and globalist pablum, it will cease to exist, either imploding from its own irrelevance, or taken over by its global masters and reduced to nothing.